lm-sensors and GKrellM with Pisi Linux   Leave a comment

lm-sensors and GKrellM

Introduction

lm-sensors Most modern motherboards are equiped with sensor(s) to measure (cpu)temperature, voltages and fanspeed. When your motherboard has a sensor most of the time you can see the readout values in one of the setup screens of the bios (not always). This is a manual to make these values visible on the desktop of Pisi Linux. On lm-sensors there is more information.
GKrellM (GNU Krell Monitors) is a computer program based on the GTK+ toolkit that creates a single process stack of system monitors. It can be used to monitor the status of CPUs, main memory, hard disks, network interfaces, local and remote mailboxes, and many other things. Plugins are available for a multitude of tasks, e.g., controlling the XMMS media player or a SETI@home client from within the stacked monitor. Released under the terms of the GNU General Public License, GKrellM is free software. More Information at the Homepage from GKrellM

Installing required packages

Open Package Manager and install the following package:
lm_sensors gkrellm
or from Commandline
sudo pisi it lm_sensors gkrellm

Which sensors are present?

To detect which sensor is present we use the sensors-detect utility.
Open a terminal (konsole) and execute sensors-detect with administrator privileges with:
sudo sensors-detect
We now get this output:
sudo sensors-detect
Password:****
Example from the Terminal Output sensors-detect
sensors-detect revision 6085 (2012-10-30 18:18:45 +0100)
System: FOXCONN A6VMX [0A]
This program will help you determine which kernel modules you need to load to use lm_sensors most effectively. It is generally safe and recommended to accept the default answers to all questions, unless you know what you’re doing.
Some south bridges, CPUs or memory controllers contain embedded sensors. Do you want to scan for them? This is totally safe. (YES/no): We get a number of these questions and answer them with [Enter] (=YES) until we reach the end with something like this:
Some south bridges, CPUs or memory controllers contain embedded sensors. Do you want to scan for them? This is totally safe. (YES/no): y Silicon Integrated Systems SIS5595… No VIA VT82C686 Integrated Sensors… No VIA VT8231 Integrated Sensors… No AMD K8 thermal sensors… No AMD Family 10h thermal sensors… Success!
   driver `k10temp‘
AMD Family 11h thermal sensors… No AMD Family 12h and 14h thermal sensors… No AMD Family 15h thermal sensors… No AMD Family 15h power sensors… No Intel digital thermal sensor… No Intel AMB FB-DIMM thermal sensor… No VIA C7 thermal sensor… No VIA Nano thermal sensor… No
Some Super I/O chips contain embedded sensors. We have to write to standard I/O ports to probe them. This is usually safe. Do you want to scan for Super I/O sensors? (YES/no):
Probing for Super-I/O at 0x2e/0x2f Trying family `National Semiconductor/ITE’… No Trying family `SMSC’… No Trying family `VIA/Winbond/Nuvoton/Fintek’… Yes Found `Fintek F71882FG/F71883FG Super IO Sensors‘ Success!
   (address 0xe80, driver `f71882fg‘)
Probing for Super-I/O at 0x4e/0x4f Trying family `National Semiconductor/ITE’… No Trying family `SMSC’… No Trying family `VIA/Winbond/Nuvoton/Fintek’… No Trying family `ITE’… No
Some systems (mainly servers) implement IPMI, a set of common interfaces through which system health data may be retrieved, amongst other things. We first try to get the information from SMBIOS. If we don’t find it there, we have to read from arbitrary I/O ports to probe for such interfaces. This is normally safe. Do you want to scan for IPMI interfaces? (YES/no):
Probing for `IPMI BMC KCS‘ at 0xca0… No Probing for `IPMI BMC SMIC‘ at 0xca8… No
Some hardware monitoring chips are accessible through the ISA I/O ports. We have to write to arbitrary I/O ports to probe them. This is usually safe though. Yes, you do have ISA I/O ports even if you do not have any ISA slots! Do you want to scan the ISA I/O ports? (yes/NO):
Lastly, we can probe the I2C/SMBus adapters for connected hardware monitoring devices. This is the most risky part, and while it works reasonably well on most systems, it has been reported to cause trouble on some systems. Do you want to probe the I2C/SMBus adapters now? (YES/no): Using driver `i2c-piix4′ for device 0000:00:14.0: ATI Technologies Inc SB600/SB700/SB800 SMBus Module i2c-dev loaded successfully.
Next adapter: SMBus PIIX4 adapter at 0b00 (i2c-0) Do you want to scan it? (yes/NO/selectively):
Next adapter: SMBus PIIX4 adapter at 0b10 (i2c-1) Do you want to scan it? (yes/NO/selectively):
Next adapter: NVIDIA i2c adapter 0 at 1:00.0 (i2c-2) Do you want to scan it? (yes/NO/selectively):
Next adapter: NVIDIA i2c adapter 1 at 1:00.0 (i2c-3) Do you want to scan it? (yes/NO/selectively):
Next adapter: NVIDIA i2c adapter 6 at 1:00.0 (i2c-4) Do you want to scan it? (yes/NO/selectively):
Now follows a summary of the probes I have just done. Just press ENTER to continue:
Driver `f71882fg‘:
 * ISA bus, address 0xe80
   Chip `Fintek F71882FG/F71883FG Super IO Sensors‘ (confidence: 9)
Driver `k10temp‘ (autoloaded):
 * Chip `AMD Family 10h thermal sensors‘ (confidence: 9)
Do you want to generate /etc/sysconfig/lm_sensors? (yes/NO): To load everything that is needed, add this to one of the system initialization scripts (e.g. /etc/rc.d/rc.local):
—-cut here—-
Chip drivers
modprobe f71882fg /usr/bin/sensors -s
—-cut here—-
If you have some drivers built into your kernel, the list above will contain too many modules. Skip the appropriate ones! You really should try these commands right now to make sure everything is working properly. Monitoring programs won’t work until the needed modules are loaded.
Unloading i2c-dev… OK
End from the Terminal output sensors-detect This shows (IN THIS EXAMPLE) that the chip `Fintek F71882FG/F71883FG‘ is present and that kernel module „f71882fg“ is needed to read this sensor.
Close the terminal and restart your computer to load kernel module and lm_sensors.

Configuration of GKrellM

GKrell Monitor
Start Menu -> Programs -> System -> GKrellM
You can configure your monitors by right clicking on the top frame or on the various monitors of GKrellM or by hitting the F1 key with the mouse in the GKrellM window.
You can drag the GKrellM window to any position on your display.
In Builtins -> Sensors you can configure the display of your sensors.
(General configuration tip for GKrellM: General>Properties put a mark at ‚Set sticky state‘ and ‚Do not include on task bar‘)
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Veröffentlicht 15. Oktober 2014 von groni in Allgemein

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